Illuminate_Zaha Hadid
We are very saddened to hear of the grand dame of architecture Zaha Hadid’s sudden death Thursday, March 31st. Admirers of her work and a good friend of Luminaire, we know her teachings and legacy will be cherished for generations to follow.

Over her 30-year career, the Iraqi-born and London based architect was renowned for her groundbreaking contributions to architecture and design with her neo-futuristic style full of smooth curves and concave shapes that seem to defy the laws of physics. She broke several preconceived notions having been the first woman and Muslim to win the prestigious Pritzker Architecture prize, and most recently the first woman to win the RIBA Gold Medal.

Zaha Hadid was born in Baghdad in 1950, studied mathematics at the American University of Beirut and later started her architecture studies in 1972 at the Architectural Association in London. She was also a partner in the Office of Metropolitan Architecture with Rem Koolhaas before establishing her own London based firm Zaha Hadid Architects.

Today with her team she has created over 900 projects. One of her first projects was the 1993 Vitra Fire Station in Weil Am Rhein, Germany that propelled her into the spotlight with its angled concrete walls and sharply pointed porticos. The MAXXI museum in Rome completed in 2010 is one of her most critically acclaimed projects and features black staircases and light fixtures that curve and flow through the structure. The Aquatics Center for the London 2012 Olympic Games is widely regarded as an emblematic Zaha Hadid building due to its wave-like roof that soars over the swimming and diving facilities.

As we say farewell to a legend, our thoughts and prayers are with her family and friends. We are proud to include several design pieces by Zaha Hadid as part of our collection such as the Moon system, Nekton, Aqua Table, and more.

In her memory, our Miami Design district showroom storefront currently showcases some of her designs which silently speak of her mastery. See images here.